ICCS Infection Prevention & Infection Control Newsletter (June 2019)

In this month's issue of the ICCS Infection Prevention & Control Newsletter, recapping some of the biggest infection prevention and control news from June, include stories on new Joint Commission antimicrobial stewardship requirements, faucet dangers, cell phone bacteria, dental antibiotics, fecal transplants and CAUTI technology.

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Joint Commission Introduces New Ambulatory Antimicrobial Stewardship Requirements — The Joint Commission announced new antimicrobial stewardship requirements for accredited ambulatory healthcare organizations that routinely prescribe antimicrobial medications.

New Jersey Issues New Infection Control Recommendations for LTC — The N.J. Department of Health issued new policy recommendations for infection control at long-term care facilities.

Hospital Faucets Can Spread Contaminants in Patient Care Areas — The results of a study showed that hospital faucet use can spread dangerous contaminants that may harm patients.

S. Aureus Prevalent on Nursing Students' Cell Phones — The results of research showed the presence of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) on the cell phones of many nursing students.

Most Antibiotics Prescribed Before Dental Procedures Unnecessary — The results of a study showed that more than 80% of antibiotics prescribed for infection prophylaxis prior to dental procedures are unnecessary.

CDC Offers New, Free Online Infection Control Training Resources — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced the availability of online interactive infection control training: "Let's Talk Patient Safety: Reducing Healthcare-Associated Infection Transmission Risk."

Attending the Georgia Society of Ambulatory Surgery Centers/South Carolina Ambulatory Surgery Center Association Joint Semi-Annual Conference and Tradeshow? Hear ICCS Founder and President Phenelle Segal present on "Controversial Infection Control Practices in Ambulatory Surgery Centers" on August 15 from 8:45 AM – 12:00 PM.

Attending the Georgia Society of Ambulatory Surgery Centers/South Carolina Ambulatory Surgery Center Association Joint Semi-Annual Conference and Tradeshow? Hear ICCS Founder and President Phenelle Segal present on "Controversial Infection Control Practices in Ambulatory Surgery Centers" on August 15 from 8:45 AM – 12:00 PM.

Every Penny Counts: Reducing Infections Improves Care, Cuts Costs — Patient safety is the primary objective of infection prevention but infection preventionists in a Syracuse healthcare system demonstrate how to make the business case for investing in protocols that save both money and lives.

Important Safety Alert Regarding Use of Fecal Microbiota for Transplantation and Risk of Serious Adverse Reactions Due to Transmission of Multi-Drug Resistant Organisms — The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) informed healthcare providers and patients of the potential risk of serious or life-threatening infections with the use of fecal microbiota for transplantation.

New Female External Catheter Technology Reduces CAUTI by 50% — Hospital-wide introduction of new female external catheter technology halved the number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), according to research.

Urinary Tract and Other Infections May Trigger Different Kinds of Stroke — Several infections have been identified as possible stroke triggers, with urinary tract infections showing the strongest link with ischemic stroke, according to research.

Infection Control in Occupational Health: CDC Seeks to Update Guidelines — Late last year, CDC sought feedback from the healthcare community on a draft guideline, Infection Control in Healthcare Personnel: Infrastructure and Routine Practices for Occupational Infection Prevention and Control Services. The CDC is updating two sections addressing protocol for infrastructure and routine practices, which initially were published in 1998.

Death Risk From Sepsis Lasts Up to Five Years— Analysis of national data by researchers found that patients who survive sepsis are at higher risk of death for up to five years.

Heart Devices: 'Less is More' in Preventing Infection — Patients who received implantable cardiac electronic devices, such as pacemakers, were associated with reduced odds of infection following simple infection prevention procedures such as skin cleaning and pre-procedure antibiotic prophylaxis, researchers found.

A Patient's Fecal Transplant Went Horribly Wrong After Developing a Deadly Infection — Fecal transplants have been a buzzy medical term thrown around a lot lately. But now the Food and Drug Administration has some scary information about the practice: It can be deadly.

Oral Steroids Put Patients with Inflammatory Disease at High Risk of Infection — In a large study of almost 40,000 adult patients with polymyalgia rheumatica or giant cell arteritis, researchers found higher absolute risks of infection when patients were taking oral steroids than when they were not taking them.

 

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